Bring Your Brain to Work

Bring Your Brain to Work

Bring Your Brain to Work is a glorious mash-up of cognitive science and career counseling. Rich with the latest research, this book reveals what our brains are doing at work—whether we’re looking for a job, beginning a career, or moving on to a new position. Then it distills the findings into smart takeaways you can apply on Monday morning. Use your brain—and read this wise and useful book.”
—Daniel H. Pink, author, When and Drive





Few people really understand their own minds or the minds of others.

Over the past decade, there has been increasing attention to what psychology can teach us about work. Research has focused on improving decision-making practices, influencing colleagues, and effective thinking. The problem is, general-interest books on these topics typically include only a smattering of business and career examples, tantalizing readers without providing real, constructive help.

Bring Your Brain to Work changes all that, bringing current cognitive science insight to specific workplace challenges. The book focuses on three elements of success: getting a job, excelling at work, and finding your next position. Professor, author, and popular radio host Art Markman expertly illustrates how cognitive science brings important perspective and insight to each of these elements.

To get a job, prospective employees must understand how employers make decisions when their offices are inundated with resumes. They need to master the practice of getting noticed in this environment and to know how, in an interview situation, to come across as exactly the individual a company wants to hire.

To keep that job, it's critical to understand the basics of mental flexibility. The most successful people in any job are the ones who master the mental challenge of learning every day, and who continuously nurture and develop relationships with colleagues and bosses.

Finally, careers require constant development. At some point, it's crucial to move up or move out, and preparing yourself to do this successfully means addressing a special set of cognitive challenges.
Integrating the latest research with engaging stories and examples from across the professional spectrum, Bring Your Brain to Work will help readers understand themselves and the people around them, providing evidence-based insight and advice on three crucial aspects of success.

Praise for Bring Your Brain to Work

"The book is aimed at job-seekers or job-changers, but it has resonance for anyone thinking about a long-term career."
Biz Ed Review.

"Recommended. Markman draws on cognitive research to offer practical advice regarding career success. He rejects the current “find your passion” approach to careers as being overly simplistic. Most of the book focuses on jobs instead of careers; it maintains a conversational tone to promote audience understanding. The most unique aspect of the book is the weight the author gives to the value of transferable skills learned outside of a formal or informal career path" 

 —Choice Magazine

"In the case of Bring Your Brain to Work, the brain science is real rather than pictorial and cleverly integrated into the typical career trajectory, from getting a job, to succeeding at work and handling setbacks. Markman demonstrates throughout how you should use three brain systems — the motivational brain, the social brain, and the cognitive brain — which are all engaged in the core tasks of “getting a job, excelling at it, and moving on”. He throws in for good measure how to use your “jazz brain” to improvise your way to a fulfilling career. 

At root, though, this book is a sensible, practical guide to jobs and the workplace. Neuroscience aside, some of the advice is sensible to the point of obvious (“focus on one task at a time as often as possible . . . be sure to take breaks from work” and so on). But Markman also recognises some truths about careers that are often overlooked by more gung-ho, passion-driven manuals. “So much of what happens in your worklife . . . falls outside what you spent the first two decades of your life learning,” he writes. The book also recognises that for all the breathless counsel about not getting overcommitted to our jobs, we are still likely to spend 75,000 hours of our life on our career. It would be brainless not to use our most powerful tool to make the most of that time. "
Financial Times--On the list of Best Business Books, June, 2019.

“Every professional needs this book. Markman has written the perfect primer for being more effective at work. And the best part? It’s science based!”
—Vanessa Van Edwards, behavioral investigator, Science of People; author, Captivate

Bring Your Brain to Work provides the tools for you to be the CEO of your own career and the author of your own life. The next chapter awaits.”
—Jeff Kaye, Co-CEO, Kaye/Bassman International and Next Level Recruiting Training

“Based on sound research in psychology and cognitive science, Bring Your Brain to Work will help you capitalize on the motivational, social, and cognitive mental systems critical for your success. Whether you’re seeking a job, trying to succeed in your current role, or hoping to move on, Markman’s book will help you stand out every step of the way.”
—Katharine Brooks, EdD, bestselling author, You Majored in What?

“In Bring Your Brain to Work, Art Markman explains what you need to know about your brain to get it to see things clearly, make better choices, and ultimately get you where you want to go: where work is meaningful and rewarding.”
—Heidi Grant, PhD,  author, Nine Things Successful People Do Differently and Reinforcements

“A fantastic collection of insights about how to put your brain to work when you’re navigating the workplace.”
David Burkus, author, Friend of a Friend and Under New Management

2 comments:

  1. Excellent thinking! Rational, logical and executable.
    Regarding Hiring managers want quality, not quantity, with a resume By Art Markman, PhD, via HBR

    Directed to senior level job seekers across industries and applicable to multiple roles
    I advise describing your background that is likely to answer the questions that the hiring authority may have about a prospective new “Job Title”, about your individual credentials. For example, include examples of achievements that demonstrate how you satisfy the position requirements. Also, to stand above your competition, put yourself in the decision maker’s shoes and spell out solutions to their anticipated concerns in the resume summary or cover letter. For instance, explain why your background in a different industry makes you prepared, why relocation is not a problem for you and how you have kept current in the industry through participation in virtual courses, professional activities, keeping up with regulatory changes, maintaining your certifications, etc. While you may think all this will be covered in an interview, first you must be invited for that meeting. If the employer is suspicious of your qualifications, you won’t pass the initial screening. Do yourself a favor and be forthright presenting yourself; if the employer is not interested when they have your data, at least you haven’t wasted time and can continue to make new connections.


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